Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis antibody and antigen (recombinant protein)

Diagnostic anti-Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis antibodies pairs and antigen for animal health (animal Bovines/Cattle infectious disease paratuberculosis) testing in ELISA, colloidal gold-based Lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA), CLIA, TINIA and POCT

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Product information

Catalog No. Description US $ Price (per mg)
GMP-VT-P050-Ag01 Recombinant Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein $3090.00
GMP-VT-P050-Ab01 Anti-Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) $3090.00
GMP-VT-P050-Ab02 Anti-Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) $3090.00

Size: 1mg | 10mg | 100mg



Product Description

Cat No. GMP-VT-P050-Ag01
Product Name Recombinant Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein
Pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis
Expression platform E.coli
Isotypes Recombinant Antigen
Bioactivity validation Anti-Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis antibodies binding, Immunogen in Sandwich Elisa, lateral-flow tests, and other immunoassays as control material in Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis level test of animal Bovines/Cattle infectious disease with paratuberculosis.
Tag His
Product description Recombinant Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis proteinwas expressed in E.coli - based prokaryotic cell expression system and is expressed with 6 HIS tag at the C-terminus.
Purity Purity: ≥95% (SDS-PAGE)
Application Paired antibody immunoassay validation in sandwich Elisa, ELISA, colloidal gold-based Lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA), CLIA, TINIA, POCT and other immunoassays.
Formulation Lyophilized from sterile PBS, PH 7.4
Storage Store at -20℃ to -80℃ under sterile conditions. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.


Cat No. GMP-VT-P050-Ab01,GMP-VT-P050-Ab02
Pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis
Product Name Anti-Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb)
Expression platform CHO
Isotypes Mouse IgG
Bioactivity validation Recombinant Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis antigen binding, ELISA validated as capture antibody and detection antibody. Pair recommendation with other anti-Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis antibodies in Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis level test of animal Bovines/Cattle infectious disease with paratuberculosis.
Product description Anti-Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) is a mouse monoclonal antibody produced by CHO technology. The antibody is ELISA validated as capture antibody and detection antibody. Pair recommendation with other anti-Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis antibodies./td>
Purity Purity: ≥95% (SDS-PAGE)
Application Paired antibody immunoassay validation in sandwich Elisa, ELISA, colloidal gold-based Lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA), CLIA, TINIA, POCT and other immunoassays.
Formulation Lyophilized from sterile PBS, PH 7.4
Storage Store at -20℃ to -80℃ under sterile conditions. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.


Reference




    Validation Data


    Click to get more Data / Case study about the product.



    Pathogen


    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is a slow-growing, acid-fast bacillus that belongs to the family Mycobacteriaceae within the phylum Actinobacteria. It is known to cause Johne's disease, a chronic infectious enteritis that primarily affects ruminant animals such as cattle, goats, and sheep. This pathogen is recognized as an important cause of economic losses in the livestock industry worldwide.

    The pathogenesis of Johne's disease is complex, and several factors contribute to the progression of the disease. MAP is primarily transmitted through ingestion of contaminated food or water. After ingestion, the bacterium invades the small intestine, where it is taken up by macrophages in the underlying Peyer's patches. These cells transport MAP to other parts of the host, including the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and intestinal tract. The immune response against MAP is not effective at clearing the infection, leading to a persistent infection that can last for years.

    Clinical signs of Johne's disease are often not apparent until the advanced stages of infection. Infected animals may experience progressive weight loss, diarrhea, decreased milk production, and ultimately wasting, leading to death in severe cases. Because of the slow progression of the disease, animals can be infected for years before showing any clinical symptoms, making it difficult to control the spread of the disease.

    Diagnosis of Johne's disease caused by MAP relies on a combination of clinical signs, histopathology, and laboratory tests. Traditional diagnostic methods include fecal culture and acid-fast staining, which can detect the presence of MAP in fecal samples. However, these methods have low sensitivity and specificity, leading to false negatives and positives. More recently, molecular diagnostic methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of MAP-specific genes, including IS900, have been developed. These tests provide rapid and accurate detection of MAP in samples.

    MAP possesses several proteins that play important roles in pathogenesis and immunogenicity. One of the most significant proteins is heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), which has been shown to be involved in the invasion of host cells and evasion of the immune response. The antigenic surface protein A (MspA) is another key protein that plays a role in the pathogenesis of MAP. MspA is an immunodominant antigen that elicits a strong immune response and has been used in various diagnostic tests, including ELISA.

    The control of Johne's disease caused by MAP is challenging, as there is no effective vaccine currently available. Control measures typically involve the isolation and culling of infected animals, along with improved management practices to reduce transmission. Several countries have implemented control programs to limit the spread of Johne's disease, including surveillance, testing, and quarantine measures.

    In conclusion, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a significant pathogen that causes Johne's disease in ruminant animals. The pathogenesis of Johne's disease is complex, and several factors contribute to the progression of the disease. Accurate diagnosis of Johne's disease relies on a combination of clinical signs, histopathology, and laboratory tests. MAP produces several proteins that are significant in pathogenesis and immunogenicity, including Hsp70 and MspA. Control of Johne's disease is challenging, and more research is needed to develop effective vaccines and control strategies.



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