equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) antibody and antigen (recombinant protein)

Diagnostic anti-equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) antibodies pairs and antigen for animal health (animal Equine/Horse infectious disease Equine influenza) testing in ELISA, colloidal gold-based Lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA), CLIA, TINIA and POCT

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Product information

Catalog No. Description US $ Price (per mg)
GMP-VT-P141-Ag01 Recombinant equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) protein $3090.00
GMP-VT-P141-Ab01 Anti-equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) $3090.00
GMP-VT-P141-Ab02 Anti-equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) $3090.00

Size: 1mg | 10mg | 100mg



Product Description

Cat No. GMP-VT-P141-Ag01
Product Name Recombinant equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) protein
Pathogen equine influenza A virus (EIV-A)
Expression platform E.coli
Isotypes Recombinant Antigen
Bioactivity validation Anti-equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) antibodies binding, Immunogen in Sandwich Elisa, lateral-flow tests, and other immunoassays as control material in equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) level test of animal Equine/Horse infectious disease with Equine influenza.
Tag His
Product description Recombinant equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) proteinwas expressed in E.coli - based prokaryotic cell expression system and is expressed with 6 HIS tag at the C-terminus.
Purity Purity: ≥95% (SDS-PAGE)
Application Paired antibody immunoassay validation in sandwich Elisa, ELISA, colloidal gold-based Lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA), CLIA, TINIA, POCT and other immunoassays.
Formulation Lyophilized from sterile PBS, PH 7.4
Storage Store at -20℃ to -80℃ under sterile conditions. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.


Cat No. GMP-VT-P141-Ab01,GMP-VT-P141-Ab02
Pathogen equine influenza A virus (EIV-A)
Product Name Anti-equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb)
Expression platform CHO
Isotypes Mouse IgG
Bioactivity validation Recombinant equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) antigen binding, ELISA validated as capture antibody and detection antibody. Pair recommendation with other anti-equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) antibodies in equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) level test of animal Equine/Horse infectious disease with Equine influenza.
Product description Anti-equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) is a mouse monoclonal antibody produced by CHO technology. The antibody is ELISA validated as capture antibody and detection antibody. Pair recommendation with other anti-equine influenza A virus (EIV-A) antibodies./td>
Purity Purity: ≥95% (SDS-PAGE)
Application Paired antibody immunoassay validation in sandwich Elisa, ELISA, colloidal gold-based Lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA), CLIA, TINIA, POCT and other immunoassays.
Formulation Lyophilized from sterile PBS, PH 7.4
Storage Store at -20℃ to -80℃ under sterile conditions. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.


Reference




    Validation Data


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    Pathogen


    Equine Influenza A Virus (EIV-A):

    Pathogen Name and Description:

    The Equine Influenza A Virus (EIV-A), also known as equine flu, is a highly contagious and infectious pathogen that primarily affects horses and other equids. It is classified within the Orthomyxoviridae family and is responsible for equine influenza, a respiratory disease that can cause significant morbidity and economic losses in the equine industry.

    Pathogen Classification:

    EIV-A is a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family, a group of viruses that are characterized by their segmented RNA genome. This virus family includes other significant influenza viruses, such as those affecting humans and avian species. The segmentation of its genome allows for frequent genetic reassortment, which can lead to the emergence of new viral strains.

    Pathogen Structure:

    The primary structural elements of EIV-A include hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), which are surface glycoproteins. These glycoproteins play a crucial role in the virus's life cycle. Hemagglutinin enables the virus to attach to host cells, while neuraminidase facilitates the release of newly formed viral particles from infected cells. Understanding the structure and function of these glycoproteins is crucial in the development of vaccines and antiviral drugs.

    Hosts and Diseases:

    Equine Influenza A Virus mainly infects horses and other equids, such as donkeys and mules. It is the causative agent of equine influenza, a disease that presents with a range of clinical signs. Infected horses commonly exhibit symptoms such as fever, cough, nasal discharge (rhinorrhea), and respiratory distress. These clinical signs can impact the animal's overall health and performance, making it a significant concern in the equine industry. In severe cases, secondary bacterial infections can further complicate the condition.

    Epidemiology and Transmission:

    EIV-A is transmitted via respiratory secretions and aerosols, making it highly contagious among horses. The virus can spread rapidly in environments where equids are in close contact, such as racetracks, equestrian events, and boarding facilities. This ease of transmission contributes to the virus's potential to cause outbreaks in equine populations.

    Vaccination has been a key strategy in controlling the spread of EIV-A. Equine influenza vaccines are routinely administered to horses to reduce the severity of the disease and limit its transmission. These vaccines are typically updated periodically to match the prevalent viral strains, as the virus can undergo antigenic drift, leading to changes in the surface glycoproteins like hemagglutinin.

    Diagnostic Methods:

    Diagnosing EIV-A infections involves various laboratory techniques. These methods aim to detect the presence of the virus or its genetic material in clinical samples, such as nasal swabs, nasopharyngeal washes, or blood samples. Some common diagnostic methods include:

    1.Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR): PCR is a molecular technique that amplifies specific viral RNA sequences, allowing for the detection of viral genetic material. This method is highly sensitive and specific.

    2.Real-time Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR): RT-PCR is used to quantitatively measure the viral RNA load in a clinical sample. It can provide information about the severity of the infection.

    3.Sequencing: Sequencing the viral genome can help in strain characterization and mutation analysis. This is essential for tracking the evolution of the virus and ensuring that vaccines remain effective against emerging strains.

    4.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA): ELISA can be used to detect viral proteins, such as hemagglutinin or neuraminidase, in clinical samples. This method is valuable for diagnosing recent infections and monitoring vaccine effectiveness.

    In summary, Equine Influenza A Virus (EIV-A) is a significant pathogen in the equine world, causing respiratory disease and impacting horse health and performance. Understanding its structure, transmission, and diagnostic methods is crucial for effective disease management and prevention in equine populations.

    Sporidium Parvum:

    Pathogen Name and Description:

    Sporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite responsible for cryptosporidiosis, a gastrointestinal illness that affects both humans and a variety of animal species. This microscopic pathogen is notorious for its resistance to chlorine-based disinfectants and is a significant concern in waterborne disease outbreaks.

    Pathogen Classification:

    Sporidium parvum falls under the category of eukaryotic microorganisms and is classified as a protozoan. Protozoa are unicellular eukaryotes known for their diverse species, some of which are parasitic in nature. Sporidium parvum is one such parasitic protozoan.

    Pathogen Structure:

    The genome of Sporidium parvum contains various genes that are critical to its life cycle and pathogenicity. Among these, the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) is noteworthy. This protein is involved in the formation of protective oocysts, a key stage in the parasite's life cycle. Understanding the structure and function of COWP is essential for developing strategies to disrupt the parasite's life cycle and prevent infection.

    Hosts and Diseases:

    Sporidium parvum has a broad host range, infecting a variety of mammals, including humans, cattle, and wildlife. Cryptosporidiosis, the disease caused by this protozoan, is characterized by profuse watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and nausea. In immunocompetent individuals, the illness is typically self-limiting, but it can be severe and life-threatening in those with compromised immune systems, such as people with HIV/AIDS or organ transplant recipients. Additionally, in young calves and other animals, the disease can lead to significant economic losses in the agricultural sector.

    Epidemiology and Transmission:

    Cryptosporidiosis is primarily spread through the ingestion of oocysts, the infectious stage of the parasite, which are shed in the feces of infected hosts. Contaminated water sources, food, and direct contact with infected individuals or animals can serve as transmission routes. Given its resistance to chlorine-based disinfectants, Sporidium parvum can persist in water supplies and cause waterborne outbreaks, making it a considerable public health concern.

    Preventing and controlling the transmission of Cryptosporidium oocysts is a challenge due to their small size and robust nature. Proper hygiene, water treatment, and sanitation measures are critical in reducing the risk of infection.

    Diagnostic Methods:

    Diagnosing Sporidium parvum infections typically involves the detection of the parasite's DNA or RNA in clinical specimens. Specific genetic markers and regions are targeted in diagnostic methods, including:

    5.18S rRNA Gene: This conserved gene is often used as a target in PCR-based techniques due to its presence in all Cryptosporidium species.

    6.Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP): Immunoassays, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), can detect this protein in clinical samples, aiding in the diagnosis of the parasite.

    7.**Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP):



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